Archive for the ‘research’ category

Getting Back on the Horse

Hello Blog. It’s been a while.

I did the ‘reflection’ class yesterday. In the introduction to the lesson I talked about the struggles that many tutors have with reflective practice. Tutors that say ‘I reflect all the time’ while rolling their eyes at the term. The post-PGCE-ers who bemoan the ‘reflecting on reflecting on my reflections’.

I told them how hearing these issues resonate with me, because I remember doing it. The memory of my PGCE was writing a reflective journal, all in one sitting, just to have something the ‘hand in’. I remember being at specialist conference having a box to fill in to reflect on the day and rolling my eyes. I remember Schon and not really understanding what he meant by ‘reflecting-in-action’ and ‘reflecting-on-action’. Read more ►

Student Voices #TDReflex14

I may be a week late with this (how much does that matter in an un0course?) but once again, the topic of the week has been timely for me.

For some reason this year I’m coming to feel that the ‘student voice’ has been really missing in my practice this year, especially around the iPad project. . I don’t really know why this has happened.

In my ESOL class I feel I have been so fixated with getting my head around teaching teenagers and two curriculums that are new to me, as well as figuring out how to effectively use 8 iPads with them, there has been almost no space for the students! How nuts does that sound. Read more ►

iPads: student explorations 2

Feeling inspired from last week’s lesson, I was glad that I had a week to think about how to follow up. The biggest challenge I found in thinking of something was the level of my students and what language they would need to review their apps. It took me a while to think about how I could simplify this enough & give them the language they would need.

Another chance corridor encounter meant that I was peer observed during this lesson too, & I know following this that this tutor has now used the iPads with her students too so I’m looking forward to chatting more about this & seeing what we can learn together.

Here’s an outline of the class: Read more ►

iPads apps: student explorations

I was (am) still feeling a little overawed with the class set of iPads. I am still taking the eight iPads into class every Monday, and most weeks they get used. But I have really focused on letting the students self-direct with using Google translate or images to check any new words or I have continued to experiment with using the app Ask3. Beyond this I was feeling a little stuck for inspiration and a Bit Daunted by the huge amount of apps available.

A chance corridor conversation gave me the nudge I needed I needed. My colleague has been using the iPads with her maths students. She told me she had initially introduced the iPads and spent some time letting the students explore the wide variety of maths-specific apps available. Now in class, she plans a 15-20 slot where students can self-direct their studies and she’s getting an informal idea of which apps they like by which ones they return to. (She also told me she had an evening student that was considering moving to the daytime class, but when she found out the iPads were not available in the daytime she decided to stay in the evening!!) Read more ►

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I actually enjoyed class today. I know – only 4 weeks in, and 4 weeks of stressing and nerves and over planning – but today I felt relaxed and ready to take on the 16-18 tech challenge. I could grow attached to this group.

I had a colleague, from my Teaching Triangle, come to class today and I few things stood out for me from our discussion. Read more ►

Setting up Class iPads: a challenge

Having the support from the fabulous people at Sunderland University last year, through the (now defunct) LSIS Research Development Fellowship, was amazing on many levels. But I had one particular Light Bulb Moment: I became conscious that the reason I was possibly slightly derogatory about class sets of iPads was because I didn’t have any experience of this. All my experience with them was around how they could be used by individuals  – firstly through my project with the tutors on the ESOL subject specialism and then through last year’s project with the HE tutors and students. Read more ►

Evidenced-based practice: the theory and practice divide

Quote from Geoff Petty

Quote from Geoff Petty

The term ‘evidenced-based practice’ is something that I’ve been coming across more and more recently. Of course, I’m aware of Geoff Petty’s work in this area, although I can’t admit to have read his whole book. I reflected on the opening speech last year, where the guest speaker talked about Hattie’s research (this was the first time I became aware of this research) The IFL have also drawn on Hattie’s research and encourage the application of evidence based learning.  My organisation has subscribed to the how2teach resources, classroom ideas based on evidence-based practice.  At the last LSIS residential, one thing that (the amazing) Frank Coffield said the value of the programme was about giving tutors the opportunity to move beyond the ‘evidence of one’. Chatting with the ‘very quoteable’ @iltman last week, he said ‘many anecdotes don’t equate to evidence’ (or something much more quotable!!) Read more ►

I have an MA paper to write ….

I have an MA paper to write as part of the Research Development Fellowship grant I have from LSIS.  It’s kind of praying on my mind.  The term ‘Literature Review’ is sending shivers down my spine.

Yet I like writing. I like writing this blog. I really liked what Julie Hugues said at a recent HuddCETT event that blogging is ‘thinking through your fingers’. Yet here I am blogging instead of getting down to MA business.

Lots of the tutors on my Technology for Learning Delivery course have started blogging, and it is interesting how many of their first posts are questioning what their blog is to be about and do they have anything to say that someone would be interested in. And reviewing my old Posterous blog, my initial musings followed similar lines – yet these were the posts that got deleted as I transferred my posts over to this blog.

I’ve been wondering if I write this blog for a specific audience. I certainly don’t get a lot of comments, if that is very evidence of audience. But I do feel a little disgruntled that at the last residential we spent a considerable amount of time discussing the MA paper, structuring this, bringing our research ‘to life’, yet despite all the talk of the need to disseminate our research, I have to write 4000 words that one, possible two, people will read.

Honestly, what’s the point?

 

RSA: iPad themes for independent learning

March 3, 2013research
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When Steve Jobs launched the iPad (way way back in 2010) he talked about the tablet filling a gap, something that fits between a smartphone and a laptop. He outlined seven tasks that the tablet would need to be better at, than a laptop or a phone. These were:Steve Jobs iPad Launch - Mobile Introduction - YouTube-1

  • browsing the web
  • watching videos
  • reading ebooks
  • email
  • enjoying and sharing photos
  • music
  • playing games

Read more ►

Bye Bye Posterous

an empty blog

an empty blog

 

Following the acquisition of the fabulous Posterous Spaces by Twitter in March 2012, they have now announced that the service will close for good as of April 30th.

My cathywint online persona grew through my cathywint.posterous.com blog, and was just the first of many many posterous spaces I used. I had a space for many classes (CELTA, DTELLS, PTLLS) including the most recent Technology For Learning Delivery. Read more ►