Archive for the ‘reflections’ category

taking a step back

step back

It has taken me almost a week to be able to get enough of a perspective to be able to sit  down and write about my first two weeks of my new 16-18 ESOL. Why? I have struggled to really unpick what has been so challenging about the first two lessons.

After my second lesson on Monday here’s about all I could manage in 140 character installments Read more ►

Setting up Class iPads: a challenge

Having the support from the fabulous people at Sunderland University last year, through the (now defunct) LSIS Research Development Fellowship, was amazing on many levels. But I had one particular Light Bulb Moment: I became conscious that the reason I was possibly slightly derogatory about class sets of iPads was because I didn’t have any experience of this. All my experience with them was around how they could be used by individuals  – firstly through my project with the tutors on the ESOL subject specialism and then through last year’s project with the HE tutors and students. Read more ►

A rough and ready post on #learnpod13

I am on a complete high from attending my second unconference today. Thoughts on the day:

Things that I knew already:

  • I like to go first. I was the first to pitch and thankfully in the first slot of the day.
  • The world is made of amazing people and I have the pleasure of having these amazing people in my PLN.
  • Meeting face to face is invaluable. Technology can enhance these relationships but face to face rules.
  • Socrative, Educreations and Show Me are good apps to have on a class set of iPads Read more ►

Memorable Moment #3 : FE Teaching and Learning Conference & CPD

FE Teaching and Learning Conference

FE Teaching and Learning Conference

conference recording

conference recording

This is the first time that I was approached by a conference to present something(rather than apply to present)so I feel particularly proud of that. It is also the most ‘formal’ presentation I have ever given. I am more used to running more hands on workshops at conferences than presenting to a room of people – and I certainly have never been recorded before!
To be honest the conference itself was not so memorable (sorry) but I did get to meet Toni Fazelli, the Chief Exec of IFL. In her keynote she asked if anyone felt supported in undertaking CPD by their organisation. I was the lone person to respond.

A Big Question: What is the ideal ratio of teachers to students?

 

 

License
AttributionShare Alike Some rights reserved by alexanderdrachmann

I caught up with the recording of the #ocTEL induction webinar today, where Diana Laurillard categorises some of the Big Questions that are being asked by those participating in this MOOC.

In one section she talks about a 1:25 ratio, of teacher:students. I thought this was kind of interesting and raised a few questions for me. Does this mean no more than 25 students in a class or that a tutor has no more than 25 students in their tutorial group? What time scale are we talking here? For example, I don’t have more than 25 students in any of my classes, but I could have up to 3 different groups of students at any one time, so at times I teach over 40 students.

Read more ►

Bye Bye Posterous

an empty blog

an empty blog

 

Following the acquisition of the fabulous Posterous Spaces by Twitter in March 2012, they have now announced that the service will close for good as of April 30th.

My cathywint online persona grew through my cathywint.posterous.com blog, and was just the first of many many posterous spaces I used. I had a space for many classes (CELTA, DTELLS, PTLLS) including the most recent Technology For Learning Delivery. Read more ►

DNA/How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet

February 18, 2013reflections
0

DNA

I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, which is this:

1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal;

2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it;

3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.

Apply this list to movies, rock music, word processors and mobile phones to work out how old you are.

Is this why senior managers are further behind the teachers who are also a couple of steps behind the students when it comes to technology and education?

Adventures on a sofa with an iPad: CPD in action

Flipboard forms my usual morning reading material, but today I felt a little more like video stimulation, so with Small Wint in school and Big Wint in the office I sat down with coffee and the TED app on my iPad. The first talk to catch my attention was Markham Nolan: How to separate fact and fiction online , and although he talks predominantly about journalism I thought some of the themes had connections to discussions we’ve been having in my Technology for Learning Delivery class on online identity and authenticating sources.I shared this link via my Twitter feed.

Read more ►

Email updates: LinkedIn

LinkedIn is one of the social media sites that I have an account, spend some time updating my profile and joining groups, but have not really got to grips with. The log in system has always been a bit off putting – I could never remember my password and then the extra security of typing in the ‘code’ never seemed to work for me, so every time I would make a conscious effort to check my account I’d give up at the first hurdle.

I do get regular email updates from the groups I have joined, but over the weeks and months I can’t say that I even bother to read them, they get instantly deleted without so much of a glance. Scanning though my emails today I see one from the HEA digest, saying that I haven’t visited the group recently and to help keep my email tidy they have unsubscribed me from the group’s digest. How very thoughtful of them.

I seem to have a small recollection of similar emails from other groups, which would explain why this is the only update I’m getting. Ho Hum.

Email updates: Diigo Groups

 

I have had a Diigo account since 2010, when Delicious was taken over by Yahoo and there were lots of discussions about the service being closed down. Then, at a RSC-YH event I went to a session on making the most of Diigo and heard about how Diigo Groups can be used to create student accounts to allow collaborative link sharing, and that this can easily be embedded into Moodle. I then started to explore this a little more.

Read more ►